Participants

Alisha Kadir’s work is about social development, youth and being very human. This sounds like music, looks like softness and lives in the village. Her place is supported by New Art West Midlands.

 

Amrita Dhallu’s background is in providing cultural learning experiences for diverse audiences, which stems from their time curating both adult and youth education programmes for the Design Museum. As they begin their journey into curating, their ambition is to create both online and physical platforms to empower and provide an opportunity for the new generation of younger individuals, particularly of black, Asian and other ethnic minorities, to showcase their contributions towards contemporary visual culture. Her place is supported by Beatfreeks.

 

Amy Pickles is an artist and loosely formed educator, working and learning between Glasgow and Rotterdam, where she is participating in the Master Education in Art at the Piet Zwart Institute. Her current research is located around critical moments, across histories, where autonomous groups of women use their voice to fight. Ongoing projects include an investigation into motherhood with friend Sally Hackett and their mums Sara and Lindy, with a residency in CCA Creative Lab (2016) and workshops with the Class Residency of Platform, Glasgow (2017). She is part of Studium, Class of ‘17, peer programmers at Witte de With, Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam.

 

Every space that we encounter has its own set of rules for how we must behave within it; what we should and shouldn’t do and an unwritten script for what is expected of us. Billy Hawes is interested in how these rules apply to both the visitors and the work on display within an exhibition space, and how these rules can be subverted to change the visitor’s experience. Questions relating to how we interact with the work, through the accepted conventions of the gallery, are explored through conversation and collaboration with other artists and curators. Through this practice, Hawes attempts to challenge curatorial conventions and the given behaviours of visitors in order to test these relationships further.

 

Ella Marshall is an emerging curator and cultural producer with a focus on socially-engaged and site-responsive practices within contemporary visual arts. Her interests include visual anthropology, spatial politics and interventions into built and natural environments, current trends within feminist art practice, and the intersection of art and activism. Since graduating in 2014 with a BA in History of Art from the University of East Anglia, she has lived in Birmingham and worked as a Curatorial Intern at Craftspace and as an Information Assistant at Ikon. Ella is Exhibitions Programmer and Visual Arts Project Manager at The GAP, a young person-led arts organisation dedicated to alternative education and the creation of community. Her place is supported by New Art West Midlands.

 

Emer Lynch is an independent curator based in Dublin. She has developed projects nationally and internationally, most recently Tables and chairs and other people (2016), a group exhibition on-site at Lynders Mobile Home Park in north Dublin, Fingal County Council. Further projects include the ongoing visual art spoken word series Foaming at the Mouth, co-curated with Tracy Hanna. She is a member of the seminar group The Enquiry, who will be participating in The Digital Aesthetic in Utopia of Access, a weekend programme of events and presentations hosted by the Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media at the Research Pavilion, 57th Venice Biennale. Lynch completed an MA in Visual Arts Practices from the Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Dun Laoghaire, 2013, and holds a Joint BA in Glass and the History of Art and Design from the National College of Art and Design, Dublin. Previous roles include Artist Liaison at mother’s tankstation limited, Dublin, and Assistant Curator of Visual Arts at Project Arts Centre, Dublin.

 

Gareth Proskourine-Barnett is an artist, researcher and educator. Since graduating with an MA in Communication Design from Central Saint Martins in 2011 he has worked on a range of self-initiated and commissioned projects, taken part in artist residencies and delivered workshops internationally. His work has been exhibited at museums and galleries in the UK, Russia, India, Thailand and the USA. Alongside his personal practice Gareth collaborates with other designers and writers on publishing projects under the name Tombstone Press. Gareth is currently working towards a PhD at the Royal Collage of Art in the department of Critical and Historical Studies. His practice-led research looks to cyberspace to provide a territory in which the ruins of Brutalist Architecture can be excavated and (re)imagined to (re)claim and (re)locate the utopian ambition of past gestures. Gareth also teaches Visual Communication and Illustration at Birmingham City University, and has lectured at a number of institutes including Brighton University of the Arts and Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok.
His place is supported by New Art West Midlands.

 

Giles Maffett is an Assistant Curator at Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art, a civic institution in the north east of England that promotes art as a tool for social change. He has worked on projects including Stephen Willats: Human Right, Daniela Ortiz: ABC of Racist Europe, and If All Relations Were to Reach Equilibrium, Then This Building Would Dissolve. He has recently completed a Masters course in Art Museum & Gallery Studies at Newcastle University, where his research focused on community-engaged curatorial practice. Previously he was a Curator at Proud Galleries, London.

 

Joseph Kendra is Assistant Curator, Public Programmes, Tate Modern and Tate Britain. He has held several positions at Tate over eight years as well as working for the BFI Southbank and Barbican Art Gallery, London. He holds an MA in Visual Anthropology from Goldsmiths, University of London, and an MA (Hons.) in Social Anthropology from the University of Edinburgh. He has worked on public programmes for Tate exhibitions including Wolfgang Tillmans, Malevich and Conflict Time Photography and has organised a number of high profile events and conferences featuring names such as Hal Foster, Theaster Gates, Zaha Hadid, Marc Jacobs and Saskia Sassen.

 

Katie Hodson sees herself as a curator, maker and doer. She is a graduate of Fine Art from the University of Worcester, and has since worked as the director of BLOK – an artist led studio and gallery project in Worcester. Her practice manifests through artist led activity within the spaces of our urban construct, and engages with the fabrication of the built environment. Her place is supported by New Art West Midlands.

 

Kirsty White is a London based independent curator. Since 2016 she has been Curator at the Swiss Church in London; responsible for developing and commissioning their 2017 contemporary arts programme. Previous projects include From the Middle Finger Tip to The Elbow Bottom (Cubitt Gallery Archive, 2016); Systems of Displaying Matter with artists Eva Fàbregas and Rachel Pimm (Enclave, London, 2016); and Richard Müller: Crystalline Vitrine (Swiss Church, 2016). From 2014 to 2015 Kirsty was Exhibitions Officer at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. In 2013, as Temporary Assistant Curator at Inverleith House, Edinburgh, she delivered Mostly West: Franz West and Artist Collaborations (2013) and Dan Colen: The Illusion of Life (2013). Kirsty is currently completing her MFA Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London. She studied BA Fine Art, at Curtin University, Western Australia, and was an invited scholar at École Nationale Supérieure des beaux-arts, Paris, in 2009/10.

 

Louise Hobson is an independent curator / producer based in Cardiff, Wales. She is currently working as an artist’s assistant, a producer of digital projects and also as the curator of Litmus, a 12-month programme of artists commissions at Oriel Davies Gallery. Recent curatorial projects include Roman Št?tina: Shave and a haircut – two bits, a site specific installation commissioned by Cardiff Contemporary and Catherine Biocca, Cornelia Baltes, Rosalie Schweiker, a group exhibition at Mission Gallery, Swansea as part of the Jane Phillips Award (both 2016).

 

Mattia Giussani is an artist and curator based in London. After graduating in BA Photography at Camberwell College of Arts in 2015, he will graduate in MFA Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London later on this summer. His research has strong interest in the relationship between digital technologies, social changes and the response of art to these challenges. Recently he’s researching within the Posthuman field, and using it as a navigation tool within different theories, especially in relation between art, computational culture, technology and new media. Recent artistic and curatorial projects include We are having a great time 🙂 at Rockelmann & (Berlin, 2016, DE) ; 9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering Revisited 1966/2016 at Arts Catalyst (London, UK, 2016); Into The Fold at Camberwell College of Arts (London, UK, 2016) ; USE/USER/USED at Zabludowicz Collection (London, 2016, UK); ICA Student Forum (London, 2015-2016, UK). Upcoming Projects: Non Standard at T-Space (Milan, June 2017, IT) ; TBC at Assembly Point (London, Sep 2017, UK)

 

Rachel Grant is an independent artist and curator working in Aberdeen, Scotland. A necessity in self organising opportunities within the city, has led her to increasingly work within a curatorial context. Her emerging curatorial practice positions the curator within a triad of artist and community, whilst her recent research focuses on the roles of performativity, hospitality and collaboration within the curatorial. She graduated in 2012 from the Sculpture department of Gray’s School of Art and has since then continued to develop her practice across visual arts, curatorial practice and educational settings. Recent projects include: ‘Community – out – bounds’ residency [research – based] with Aberdeen city’s Creative Learning team 2016 and ‘Freed Market: How do we feed ourselves?’ a six month project, in partnership with the Scottish Sculpture Workshop [SSW] in Lumsden, Aberdeenshire and Seventeen Creative hub in Aberdeen 2015. She has also worked on a national and international level with programming internships at SSW and the Klondike Institution of Art and culture [KIAC]. She is currently working as a lecturer in Contemporary Art Practice at Gray’s School of Art. This year she will be developing ongoing projects with artists working in a social context and a series of collaborative exercises that unpack the potential relationship between artist and curator using performative acts and hospitality as a model for building trust and empathy with one another.

 

Yvonne Billimore is a creative practitioner, currently working at the Scottish Sculpture Workshop in Aberdeenshire, where she develops and produces the SSW programme. Working within a residency context and through various projects, she mostly works with artists during the thinking and making process, and is interested in developmental and studio-based curation, as well as creating participatory frameworks. Previously based in Dundee, she worked on the committee of artist-run space, Generator Projects and also set up and ran the DSG Engagement Project, a creative support project in a homeless hostel. Yvonne works across disciplines and connects with different groups, particularly with the aim to address social and environmental justice through collective and creative practices.