Laura Oldfield Ford in conversation

Join us for a full listening to the sound piece in Laura Oldfield Ford’s solo show, Chthonic Reverb. This will then be followed by a conversation between Ford and lecturer in cultural geography, Dr Phil Jones. They will be discussing cities, culture, architecture and regeneration.

Phil Jones is Senior Lecturer in Cultural Geography and leader of the Human Geography Research Group at the University of Birmingham. His research is primarily concerned with urban cultures, exploring a number of topics including urban regeneration, the creative economy, cycling and mobilities. He has a particular interest in research methods, including qualitative GIS, mobile interviewing and arts-based approaches. More information on his work can be found at philjonesgeography.co.uk and he tweets @philjonesgeog.

Laura Oldfield Ford b.1973 ( Halifax, West Yorkshire) is an artist working and living in London. She completed a BA at the Slade in 2001, an MA in Painting at the RCA in 2007, and is curently a researcher in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art . Recent exhibitions include Itinerant Code, Tensta Konsthall, 2015; Ruin Lust, Tate Britain 2014; Recording Britain, V&A 2012; Anarchy Unmasked, British Library 2014; Soft Estate, Bluecoat Liverpool 2013 and Spacex 2013; Desire Lines, Caja Madrid, Barcelona 2012; There is a Place New Art gallery Walsall 2012; Orbitecture Focal Point Gallery, Southend 2011 and Poster Sites Arnolfini, Bristol 2010.

In 2013 she was awarded a Stanley Picker Fellowship at Kingston University where she undertook new research on the phenomenon of suburbanisation. This culminated in a show—Seroxat, Smirnoff, THC— in 2014.

She lectures and teaches across the UK and internationally on issues surrounding urbanism, architecture, protest and memory. This has included institutions such as Royal College of Art, Chelsea, Central St Martins and Goldsmiths. She regularly give talks and lectures on similar themes; recent examples are Tate Britain, Goethe Institute Amsterdam, British Library, LSE, Tensta Konsthall.

Writing is an integral part of her practice, and in 2011 Verso published a collection of her zine Savage Messiah. She is a contributing writer/artist to Art Review, Guardian, Granta Magazine, Building Design, Mute magazine and Verso Blog.

 

Join us for a full listening to the sound piece in Laura Oldfield Ford’s solo show, Chthonic Reverb. This will then be followed by a conversation between Ford and lecturer in cultural geography, Dr Phil Jones. They will be discussing cities, culture, architecture and regeneration.

Phil Jones is Senior Lecturer in Cultural Geography and leader of the Human Geography Research Group at the University of Birmingham. His research is primarily concerned with urban cultures, exploring a number of topics including urban regeneration, the creative economy, cycling and mobilities. He has a particular interest in research methods, including qualitative GIS, mobile interviewing and arts-based approaches. More information on his work can be found at philjonesgeography.co.uk and he tweets @philjonesgeog.

Laura Oldfield Ford b.1973 ( Halifax, West Yorkshire) is an artist working and living in London. She completed a BA at the Slade in 2001, an MA in Painting at the RCA in 2007, and is curently a researcher in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art . Recent exhibitions include Itinerant Code, Tensta Konsthall, 2015; Ruin Lust, Tate Britain 2014; Recording Britain, V&A 2012; Anarchy Unmasked, British Library 2014; Soft Estate, Bluecoat Liverpool 2013 and Spacex 2013; Desire Lines, Caja Madrid, Barcelona 2012; There is a Place New Art gallery Walsall 2012; Orbitecture Focal Point Gallery, Southend 2011 and Poster Sites Arnolfini, Bristol 2010.

In 2013 she was awarded a Stanley Picker Fellowship at Kingston University where she undertook new research on the phenomenon of suburbanisation. This culminated in a show—Seroxat, Smirnoff, THC— in 2014.

She lectures and teaches across the UK and internationally on issues surrounding urbanism, architecture, protest and memory. This has included institutions such as Royal College of Art, Chelsea, Central St Martins and Goldsmiths. She regularly give talks and lectures on similar themes; recent examples are Tate Britain, Goethe Institute Amsterdam, British Library, LSE, Tensta Konsthall.

Writing is an integral part of her practice, and in 2011 Verso published a collection of her zine Savage Messiah. She is a contributing writer/artist to Art Review, Guardian, Granta Magazine, Building Design, Mute magazine and Verso Blog.