Torsten Lauschmann
Before the Revolution

Before the Revolution traces a development in Torsten Lauschmann’s recent practice considering his work in the context of expanded cinema. Motivated by curiosity he works with a broad spectrum of mediums both new and obsolete which encompass sculpture, video projection, animation, photography, music and performance. Diverse too are the contexts in which his work can be found, ranging from galleries to theatres; cinemas and the internet. What often unites this work is its constant transformation, deconstructing and reconfiguring it to further test the boundaries of its medium. Since 2000 Lauschmann has explored the sculptural qualities of video projection, often projecting found footage or animation onto elaborate geometric wall drawings and sculptural objects to create the illusion of three dimensionality.

Lauschmann’s exploration of the influence technology has had on the two dimensional form is dominant. Before the Revolution (2011) and Thaumatrop No 1: Bird in a Cage (2009) originate from the flat surface. Before the Revolution sees a photograph of a painting displayed on a television monitor with a familiar computer loading symbol endlessly looping. While the work acknowledges the inevitable glitches experienced when technology stalls it also stealthily captures the multiple ways we engage with two dimensional images. The work alludes to the manner in which we now commonly experience mediums originally intended for actual embodied encounters.

Skipping Over Damaged Areas (2010) sews together movie title sequences to create a fantastical, dream inspired narrative. Drawn from an array of films including Hollywood blockbusters and cult classics they create a story narrated by voice over artist Iain Champion. Appropriated found footage from before the digital age gives works a sense of nostalgia reminding the viewer of their tangible links with film.

Life-Like (2008), extends Lauschmann’s work into the realm of expanded cinema, recalling Anthony McCall’s seminal work Line Describing a Cone(1973) the work is completed with the participation of the viewer. The space transforms as the rays of light cast rapidly shift shadows across the gallery walls. http://www.torstenlauschmann.com/#/lifelike-2008/4549784941

See a review of the show by Adele Mary Reed on This is Tomorrow

Torsten Lauschmann (b.1970, Bad Soden, German) recently presented major solo exhibition Startle Reaction at Dundee Contemporary Arts as part of the Discovery Film Festival, was shortlisted for the Jarman Award (2011) and is currently exhibiting at the BFI Southbank as part of the Samsung Art+ Prize.   Last year he won the inaugural Margret Tait Award and worked on major commissions with Film and Video Umbrella and LUX. Lauschmann is represented by Mary Mary, Glasgow. A major publication of his work is planned for 2012.

Before the Revolution traces a development in Torsten Lauschmann’s recent practice considering his work in the context of expanded cinema. Motivated by curiosity he works with a broad spectrum of mediums both new and obsolete which encompass sculpture, video projection, animation, photography, music and performance. Diverse too are the contexts in which his work can be found, ranging from galleries to theatres; cinemas and the internet. What often unites this work is its constant transformation, deconstructing and reconfiguring it to further test the boundaries of its medium. Since 2000 Lauschmann has explored the sculptural qualities of video projection, often projecting found footage or animation onto elaborate geometric wall drawings and sculptural objects to create the illusion of three dimensionality.

Lauschmann’s exploration of the influence technology has had on the two dimensional form is dominant. Before the Revolution (2011) and Thaumatrop No 1: Bird in a Cage (2009) originate from the flat surface. Before the Revolution sees a photograph of a painting displayed on a television monitor with a familiar computer loading symbol endlessly looping. While the work acknowledges the inevitable glitches experienced when technology stalls it also stealthily captures the multiple ways we engage with two dimensional images. The work alludes to the manner in which we now commonly experience mediums originally intended for actual embodied encounters.

Skipping Over Damaged Areas (2010) sews together movie title sequences to create a fantastical, dream inspired narrative. Drawn from an array of films including Hollywood blockbusters and cult classics they create a story narrated by voice over artist Iain Champion. Appropriated found footage from before the digital age gives works a sense of nostalgia reminding the viewer of their tangible links with film.

Life-Like (2008), extends Lauschmann’s work into the realm of expanded cinema, recalling Anthony McCall’s seminal work Line Describing a Cone(1973) the work is completed with the participation of the viewer. The space transforms as the rays of light cast rapidly shift shadows across the gallery walls. http://www.torstenlauschmann.com/#/lifelike-2008/4549784941

See a review of the show by Adele Mary Reed on This is Tomorrow

Torsten Lauschmann (b.1970, Bad Soden, German) recently presented major solo exhibition Startle Reaction at Dundee Contemporary Arts as part of the Discovery Film Festival, was shortlisted for the Jarman Award (2011) and is currently exhibiting at the BFI Southbank as part of the Samsung Art+ Prize.   Last year he won the inaugural Margret Tait Award and worked on major commissions with Film and Video Umbrella and LUX. Lauschmann is represented by Mary Mary, Glasgow. A major publication of his work is planned for 2012.

Torsten Lauschmann, Before the Revolution
Torsten Lauschmann, Before the Revolution
Torsten Lauschmann, Before the Revolution
Torsten Lauschmann, Before the Revolution